Nearly there

Nearly there

I just have one more “thing” to do on Acorn, and then I can call it finished. All I have to do then is write up the pattern, test knit it, or find somebody I can trust to help me out, and I can send it to Kerrie.

In the meantime, look at the amazing pooling I got with the yarn!

acorn pooling

acorn pooling2

I’m not saying whether or not this is the “right” way up, sideways or inside out. You’ll just have to wait and see!

From the BBC News Online pages

For your scientific-reading. The ones that I’m thinking of getting from the library are marked in red. I’m a great fan of accessable scientific liturature, or “pop Sci lit” if you will! I hope to be able to do this kind of thing for a living one day, either in books, journals or newspapers. Do you think I’m gobby enough? Actually, don’t answer that!

The full longlist for the 2006 Aventis General Prize:

Electric Universe – How Electricity Switched on the Modern World, by David Bodanis (Little Brown)

Collapse – How Societies Choose to Fail or Survive, by Jared Diamond (Penguin Allen Lane)

The Elements of Murder – A History of Poison, John Emsley (Oxford University Press)

The Gecko’s Foot – Bio-inspiration – Engineering New Materials from Nature, by Peter Forbes (Fourth Estate)

The Silicon Eye – How a Silicon Valley Company Aims to Make All Current Computers, Cameras, and Cell Phones Obsolete, by George Gilder (WW Norton)

Parallel Worlds – The Science of Alternative Universes and our Future in the Cosmos, by Michio Kaku (Penguin)

Power, Sex, Suicide – Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life, by Nick Lane (Oxford University Press)

Venomous Earth – How Arsenic Caused the World’s Worst Mass Poisoning, by Andrew Meharg (Macmillan)

Empire of the Stars – Friendship, Obsession and Betrayal in the Quest for Black Holes, by Arthur I. Miller (Little Brown)

Seven Deadly Colours – The Genius of Nature’s Palette and how it Eluded Darwin, by Andrew Parker (Simon & Schuster)

The Truth About Hormones – What’s Going on when we’re Tetchy, Spotty, Fearful, Tearful or Just Plain Awful, by Vivienne Parry (Atlantic Books)

Stalking the Riemann Hypothesis – The Quest to Find the Hidden Law of Prime Numbers, by Dan Rockmore (Jonathan Cape)

The Fruits of War – How War and Conflict have Driven Science, by Michael White (Simon & Schuster)

Hmm … I have quite diverse interests, don’t I?!

And finally, a slightly bizzare request…

Do you work for/study in an institution/organisation that has an online subscription to the Journal of American Medical Association? There are a couple of research papers that could be key to my dissertation, but my uni doesn’t subscribe, and there isn’t a work-around (I’ve tried).

***ADDED*** I just tried something and it worked! I registered for the free content, and that means I can get hold of most things over 6 months old. This is great, but be on stand-by in case I need something younger! You have been warned!

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3 thoughts on “Nearly there

  1. I’m also a big fan of popular science. I’m part way through the mitochondria book right now (I’ve been fascinated by these organelles ever since reading Lewis Thomas’s Lives of a Cell years ago.

    I thought the Jared Dimond (Collapse was good, but not nearly as groundbreaking as Guns, Germs, and Steel.

    Thanks for your blog, which I throroughly enjoy!

    Like

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