Process vs product

Process vs product

Are you a process knitter or a product knitter?

In other words, do you knit because you enjoy the action of knitting or because you like getting a knitted garment at the end of it all. Or are you, like me, a little of both?

I love the feeling and rhythm of the knitted stitches, the creative nature of knitting and I like designing (either on the scale of stitches or whole items). However, I also like getting a piece of clothing (or an accessory) at the end of it all. I love the feeling of accomplishing something that other people can actually see (unlike my university work where only my tutor and my family knows how well/badly I’ve done)!

So, to continue the theme, I have a product and a process to show you.

The product:

Ta-da! My anklet Fluted Banister socks from the Six Sox KAL. The very unusual “ribbing” makes them fit well over my foot, but does allow for some puffy-foot days. I have enough of the yarn left to make another pair of anklets. Project details here. You have no idea how difficult it is to take a decent photo of your own socks on your own feet. This one involved my desk, a chair, long arms and a little discomfort!

The process:

A swatch (or tension square for those of us who adhere to British standards!) for the Canadian Living Poncho. For a better picture on a real person click here (scroll down – second photo). I got gauge (tension) on Denise US 11s, but since it’s only a poncho I’m not sure that it really matters.

On another note: does anyone actually get row gauge? I checked mine on the aforementioned DK/Aran swatch and I got 20 rows = 4″ when I should be getting 16 rows. Short of using one US11 and one US13 to lengthen the number of rows (which of course would throw out the stitch gauge) what’s a girl to do?

This is by far the worst cold I’ve ever had (and I’ve had real flu, in the middle of summer as well) and my mum agrees. It’s an upside-down cold where it starts on the lungs, moving up to the sinuses and the head and then going back to the lungs again. Oh, and it last twice as long as well. So, if you’re suffering under this or any other cold, my sincere sympathies are with you.

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2 thoughts on “Process vs product

  1. I almost never get row gauge. In fact, I almost never check it, because I know it won’t be right. I subscribe to the “close enough” school of knitting – if I have the right amount of sts per inch, the row gauge will most likely be close enough. Even for detailed sweater sleeve cap/armhole shaping, I’ll knit it through once, see how it looks, and only recalculate the pattern for my row gauge if it’s way off. (But I like to live on the edge like that… also, I might be a bit lazy.)

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